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Case-control study on the use of mobile and cordless phones and the risk for malignant melanoma in the head and neck region

Overview of attention for article published in Pathophysiology, September 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#14 of 278)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
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Title
Case-control study on the use of mobile and cordless phones and the risk for malignant melanoma in the head and neck region
Published in
Pathophysiology, September 2011
DOI 10.1016/j.pathophys.2011.06.001
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lennart Hardell, Michael Carlberg, Kjell Hansson Mild, Mikael Eriksson

Abstract

The incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma has increased during the last decades in Sweden as in many other countries. Besides of ultraviolet radiation and constitutional factors such as light-sensitive skin and poor ability to tan few risk factors are established. Some studies indicate that electromagnetic fields might be of concern. In this case-control study we assessed use of mobile and cordless phones in 347 cases with melanoma in the head and neck region and 1184 controls. These subjects constituted 82% and 80%, respectively, that answered the questionnaire. Overall no increased risk was found. However, in the most exposed area; temporal, cheek and ear, cumulative use >365h of mobile phone yielded in the >1-5-year latency group odds ratio (OR)=2.1, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.7-6.1 and cordless phone use gave OR=2.1, 95% CI=1.1-3.8. Highest OR was calculated for first use of mobile or cordless phone before the age of 20 years regardless of anatomical localisation in the head and neck region. No interaction was found with established risk factors such as red, medium blond or fair hair colour, blue eyes, skin type I or II (never or sometimes tanned), severe sunburns as teenager or heredity. The results must be interpreted with caution due to low numbers and potential methodological shortcomings in a case-control study. However, the findings might be consistent with a late carcinogenic effect from microwaves, i.e. tumour promotion, but need to be confirmed.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Finland 1 2%
Unknown 46 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 21%
Student > Master 6 13%
Other 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Other 9 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 21%
Engineering 7 15%
Social Sciences 6 13%
Unspecified 3 6%
Other 12 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 20. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2015.
All research outputs
#651,697
of 12,280,928 outputs
Outputs from Pathophysiology
#14
of 278 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,235
of 222,603 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pathophysiology
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,280,928 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 278 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 222,603 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.